A TYPE of Speaking

Once I knew only darkness and stillness… my life was without past or future… but a little word from the fingers of another fell into my hand that clutched at emptiness, and my heart leaped to the rapture of living.–Helen Keller

A couple of months ago, I had a revelation.

Josiah with his trusty iPad!

While wrestling with the fact that my beautiful little boy is still “pre-verbal” at 5 1/2, I recognized potential existed beyond the breakthrough of words. He IS in there, whether words ever exit through his lips or not. And he’s more aware of everything around him than I know.

I’ve wanted to believe he was, but in his silence or intelligible noises, at times I’ve forgotten. And doubted. And been less expressive back to him myself because I sometimes lose motivation to “chat” when it’s one way.

Somewhere while looking for clues of what Josiah comprehends within the quagmire of “expressive” and “receptive” language charts and graphs, or labeling stuff by tapping on a picture square, a chunk of optimism fell off my heart. I never thought with all the early intervention and everything we’ve thrown into this guy that we would be HERE. Less spoken words than ever, and he’s almost 6-years-old. Without words, his true intelligence is missed and misunderstood by those of us out here that don’t know how to mine for it. But oh, he has a light in his eyes and is full of joy!

When so much time, money and effort all of these years has gone into unearthing the holy grail of “progress” in my mind–“Can he TALK?”–I’ve been prompted to change my perspective of what I truly need for him. “Can he learn to communicate?” Not just “I want swing” or “I want donut” by pointing to talking pictures on his iPad. But tell us what he’s THINKING. What he loves. What he’s curious about. Or just simply in this crazy autism world of asking him the “what is it”s, I want him to be able to ask me “Why?” about something. Anything.

I watched the HBO documentary A Mother’s Courage a couple of months ago, and it ignited a new fire in me to help unlock my son’s world. (You can Netflix it if you haven’t seen it.) It featured something call the “Rapid Prompt Method,” and kids who everyone thought couldn’t learn or had very immature minds because they couldn’t talk were showing everyone what they were made of . Even the most “severe” were learning to choose and discuss topics and to write. And some were eventually learning at grade level and communicating their thoughts brilliantly. They were funny and they had a lot of things to say like the rest of us. You wouldn’t have known it from the outside that they were even listening.

The documentary “A Mother’s Courage” shows several scenes about the Rapid Prompt Method…

This news story features a kid who was “sorting silverware and doing first-grade work” the year before and just won the 8th grade science fair doing college-level chemistry after learning how to use a letter board to communicate!

Then, this documentary called “Wretches and Jabberers” came out and I hope to see it. In the trailer, you see that the adult autistic man answers the question, “So you’re saying all our assumptions about you are wrong?” He replies, “More like you than not.”

So, I’m trying yet another new thing this summer. I’m packing up Josiah for 4 days and driving 5 hours to Green Bay, WI where I found out that a lady that apprenticed under the developer of the Rapid Prompt Method has opened a therapy center. I’m willing to risk $460 to check it out. I’ve contacted three other people that have tried this with their children, and they all have said it has been well worth it.

I want to see if my boy who’s a whiz on the iPad could learn to type one day and rip down this word barrier. I want my son to LEARN, not just label. I want my son to COMMUNICATE, not just behave. Josiah attends a center-based therapy center 40 hours a week of the ABA/AVB, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy variety. What if he learned how to spell, and he could be educated? What if he was able to gain confidence and interest in learning how to do something that made him feel valuable and like he had an outlet? Perhaps we need a little more creativity.

I’m thankful that Josiah has come so far. He’s really a delightful little boy. It’s time for him to learn how to communicate and to show off what he already knows. I continue to pray for God’s healing to release that tongue of his. In the meantime, I’m compelled to give this Rapid Prompt Method a go. I’ll let you know!